Gravel Review: Slow And Steady Doesn’t Win The Race


Arcade racing games have been few and far between during this console generation, which makes Click image to view in full screenAll of this speaks to a lack of depth to Gravel’s off-road racing. This wouldn’t be an issue on its own, but the simplicity of its action craves an exciting assortment of tracks to really coalesce its various systems into something approaching an engaging racing game, and Gravel falls short of the mark. There are outliers, of course: the point-to-point cross country races through Alaska and the sun-drenched beaches of Namibia are highlights due to their white-knuckle nature and environmental variety. However, the rest fail to get the blood pumping with any sort of regularity. There are a few real world Rallycross tracks, but most of the courses on offer are fictional, and it’s a shame they’re not more imaginative. The majority of the time I felt like I was simply going through the motions, even after bumping the difficulty up to hard for a more substantial challenge. And this feeling is only exacerbated by the limited number of environments on offer, with multiple tracks taking place in the same locations.Meanwhile, multiplayer options are confined to creating your own lobby to invite friends, or jumping into a quick match in the hopes of finding others to race against–but this is easier said than done. After numerous attempts I’ve only managed to find a solitary match, which was populated with three other people (the rest of the grid was made up of AI drivers). Other than this I’ve had no luck finding another race, even a week after launch. Visually, weather and lighting effects are occasionally impressive, but otherwise Gravel’s tracks mostly look flat, and a short draw distance leads to shadows and foliage frequently popping into view. There’s also a lack of detail to each vehicle’s body, and a smoothness to each one that gives the illusion they’re coated in a sheen of vaseline. They look more like toy cars than the high-powered mud-churners they should be.In my mind’s eye, Gravel’s bland visuals contribute to a game that doesn’t look too dissimilar from the seven year old titles it most closely resembles. There’s something appreciable about its no-nonsense style, and there’s definitely some intermittent fun to be had with its arcade style racing. But it doesn’t do anything that its contemporaries haven’t done better before, and it fails to stand out as an enjoyable alternative, which is unfortunately reflected by its barren multiplayer component. Like the fireworks that occasionally ignite throughout select races, Gravel’s attempts at excitement don’t quite dazzle.


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